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AG88导航网【ag88.shop】环亚手机版 oRFBcKpEI/nside Bu\dapest's \green new campusJUxO

MM5FFor 50 yea\r】s an Israeli【 o【il comp【【any has 】kept bathers 【off a Red Sea bea/ch near】 t/he resort of Eilat bu】t \it co【/uldn’t 】stop sea life from flouri\shing.I【n a wor\ld where co】【r】al r】eefs are s】hrink\ing rapidly, the one \in Eila\t has grown.Due/ to /a lack of human interf】e【rence,】 a spectacular /coral reef blo/】sso】med o】v【er time attracting exotic /fi】sh \and/【 dolphins to th/is 【aquatic paradi\se.The 300-me\tre-long be】ach was handed back to the publi\c a year an/d a half ago after the】 Eilat Ashkelon P【ipeline 】Company (EAPC) 【scaled back it\s operat】io【ns.Now, with access lift【【e/d, int】erest is /mounting 【f\rom scuba divers \an\d tourist】s/ alike w/ho want【 to vi】sit.In response, Israel's Na/ture and Par/ks Authority decided to relocate the cora\ls for their own pr/otecti】on so \the /ind】ustri/al de/bris left /】】by E【APC\ could be removed.S【hare this articleCopy/paste】 t【he article 【video embe】/d link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendS】hareTw】eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【areShare\ShareSendSh/areShareY/ou\ might also 【like 】 '\;Israel is no l/onger a democracy�】9;: Netan\yahu accused of exp【loi】ting coron/avirus to sa/ve career 【 / 】 \】 / / Israel e\】lection: Exit p/olls give Netanyah】u nar\r/ow/ lead / 【 \ \ 】 】 】 / 】 \ \/ / 】 】 Palestinian P\resident Ab】bas cu】ts ties with Israel a】nd US 】over peace plan / More aboutCora/lsIsrael\Envir【onmentEnvironmental protectio【noil 【industry】Touri\sm Browse today's tag】sln1k

MnGcT/witte【r react【s to police ba\n o/n E\xtinction 】Rebellion pro【tes\ts in Lond/onfqr3yc0C

TfnVAt the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tagsQ399

yXylMont Saint M】ichel\ recla/ims/ isl】a/nd-li【ke character \after year/s of major constru\ctionJTQV

hsgTWhat is Earth Day/? | Euronew【s answers5MWA

Te/x【t sizeAaAaA few hundred【 kilo】m【etres 】off the Pacific coast of Ch\ile there is \a 】paradise for div【ers and hikers.The Robin\son \C【rus【oe island i】s one of the three for【】ming the Juan Fern\ande\z archipelago.The islan\d chain secured \its place 】in history as/ the home o】f Alexande【r Selkirk, the\ Scottis】h s\ailor】】 】marooned there for fo/ur years and four mo/nths, a tale he later related t\o Daniel Defoe\,/ who penned his 】adv\enture \book ba】sed\ on his sto【ry.For almost【 a century, the in/habitants of R【obins\o\n Cruso】e ha】ve known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them co/nserving its【 unique wildlife, 【s/o they【 decided about /taking step/s a/s ear】ly as 1935.In 1977, the arc/hipel\ago was named a biospher】e reserve and almost a year a【go, Chile announced the creation of the enormous Juan Ferna】ndez Marine Park, one of the largest p【rotected zo【nes i/n th\e Pacific.It al【so co】nnects to【 a network 】of marine reserves in Chile total\/ling some 】【1.】3 【m】illion squa/re /kilometres】【, meaning that about 44 perce】nt of the nation's】 waters ha】ve some lev【el of\ protection against min【】ing and indust【】rial】 fishing."Until 10 years ago, C\hile was one o\f the bi】ggest o】cean exp\】loiters i\n the world, but now i\t ha【s 】changed course】 【and be【【come o】【ne of\ the leaders【 i【n o\cean cons/ervation, /with the creation of/ hug\e marine \parks which \wi\ll】 really help /fish/ s】tocks recover," said Alex \Munoz,【\ Latin Amer】i【ca dir\【ect】or of【 the/ NGO\ Nation】al Geographic Pristine Seas.C】lick 【o/n the 】video above to learn more\ abou】t h】ow these islands preserved 】their fragile ecosyste\m【.S\hare】 thi】s【 article More fro】】m places

dne1A\ctivists【 are】 raising funds to save Danish wooden 】【boat】sp4ej

Arf0You’ve heard of offs\ett\ing, but】 what in the w【orld is carbon ins/etting?LFZj

CyvwSoybean\ s【kiwear is th/e new plan】t-ba/【\sed tre【nd of 2020rlsz

3ytZ“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207\The sout\h-west Africa】n /country of An/gola is wakin】g up to /its\ tour/ism potenti/al, offering opportunitie/s for vi【sitor【\s and /in【vestor\s a【lik【e./One of the】 most unspo\ilt regions\ is th】e Namibe deser/t, wh/ich/\ stretches 2,000 kil【ometr】es acr【o\ss t】hree countri【es.T【he dese\rt runs all 】the way from t/he/ Iona Nation\al Park in A】\ngola, t】hrough/【 Namib【【ia, to South Af\ric\a&r】squo;s 】Kalahari Desert - more 【than 80,000】 square kilometres. You \can\ drive for hour/s along the Corridor of the Tides, where the desert meets the ocean.N】a/m\ib】e mean】s ‘’vast pla\ce’&rsquo【;\ in the local la\ng/uage and it lives up【 to its name &/nd【ash; a tourism wonderl【and with a s\p\ect】acula\r coastlin【e.A\ndrea\ Mar【tins【【 runs an eco-touris】m lodge perched abo【ve a 】grotto on the Atlantic Oc】ean. Praia do \Soba, meaning &lsqu\o;Beach of the Chief’, offe【/rs mag【/nificent view【s of sandstone \cliff/s c】/arve\d by na【ture.【Mar】ti【ns says】 the locatio【n was dis/cov\ered by her f\ather and\ the【 family/ decided to inv】est there.She comp】/a\r/es her adventuro/us fat\her to the movie character Crocodile Dundee.“This wa\s the\ l】a】/st lost paradise of】 Angola】, beca】use no one fo/und this 【plac【e, becau\s【e there was】\ no road, /no/ access, and my Crocodile 【Dundee, m【y father, the/ Ango】lan Crocod/ile Du】】ndee, arr\ived here, he m【ade】 a road, an】d he found this amazi】ng place.&rdq】uo/;The ind】i】vidual hut【s are //beautif【ully decorated, and there are plans to build more. The/re are also plans to provide luxury campsites for so-cal】led glam/ping tourism.Marti【ns tol【d Business Angola: “W\e 】want t/o make a bigger r】e/staurant, a conference room,/ more rooms and we want to (【do) glamping, to have【 al【l kinds of people here.&rd\/quo;Martin Bremer, a S/out/h African businessman, already ru】】/ns】 a g】lamping compa【【ny, giving tourists 【a/ chance to t【ravel dee【【p into the heart of Nami】be\ pro/vi【nce.Bremer\ has travelle】d extensiv】ely th【rough southern Africa as part\ of his stone business.&】ldq/uo;We visited all sorts of &l【squo\;off the beaten track’ (places), a】ll the uncha\rted sites. And i】t was just a\ n/a\/tural thi\ng to do to bring p【eople into this area./”Bremer/ says co【mp\ared to /other countri【es in southe/rn Africa, An【gola is ripe for investm】ent in tourism.&l【dquo;It【's op】e\n, 】it's becoming much easier to for【m partnerships. They】've changed m\any of the la\【ws to make it ea【sier for /people t\o invest. There ar/e great c【ompan/ies in Angola.”It&rsquo/\;s hope/d【 a/ 500 mi【l/l【ion-euro expansion of the southe\rn port of Namibe\ w】ill have flow-on eff【/ects for t/ourism a】nd \leisure.Japanese company Toyota is be【hi\nd the investment, wh\ich will 】doub\le the size /of the】【 po】rt, connect\ed to the region by rail, while adding tou\rism and lei/sure facilities.Nuno Borges da Silva, \Chairman of \Toyo\ta Angola, told Business An【gol\a: “The port will /be a big support fo【r tourism/ ves【se\ls】, because】【 now they 】don't hav】e conditions/ to 【bring vessels and tour【i【sts. But w/hen this p【ort【 is ready it wil/l be very beautif/ul, and y/ou can al\so d【oc】k b】ig vessels.&r】【dq】/uo;【He said for【eigners can invest \in An\gola without any local/ partners.&ld【quo;Let'】s say it's more open to the peop【le to come and \invest w【ithout any difficulty, a\ny problem,【” he said.【Sha【re this articleC【/opy/pas\te the/ article video embed link be/low:CopyShareTweetShar\esendShareTweetSharesendMor【e【Hide\Share【SendS【】hareShar/eShareSen】\dSh【/a】reSh\ar\e【More aboutTouri/smFauna and】 Fl/oraEnvironment\al prot】ectionAn\golaAfrica Bro【wse today�】【;s /t【ag】s 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagslp9o

2EFI\Wildlife photography:“I】\t's not just about beautiful pictures”iKSJ

bYjNTe】xt s/izeAaAaWith a vie【【w to r\】ai\se awareness of the damaging i】mpact of carbon emissions produced from fly【ing, the UK are planning to introduce a tax to of【fset【 emissions. This &lsqu/o;carbo【n\ charge’ added to flight/ ticket pr【/\ices would/ fund eco-f/riend】ly pro/jects, like p】lanting\ t】rees to red/uce【 CO2 levels in o【ur/ a【tmosphe/re./ T】his sche】me would hopefully /encourage air passengers【 t】o fly le】\s/s】 frequently and to be aware o\f the ef/fect/ of t】ransport emis】】sions/ on th/e planet. But, do we ne/ed to【 f/ly【 to /a new destination to have an enric/hing summer holiday? \Can we have a real brea】k【 f【rom daily 【/life and n/ot \fly to a faraway de\stination? We【 /believe\ you abso/lutely】【 can and the】 /holi【day of d//r【e/ams you're lo\oking for, ma】y 【just be waiting for you in t/he countryside.The menta/l h】\ealth charity Mind state tha】t, &l】【/dq\u】o;spending ti【me in green spaces or bringing nature into your everyday life can】 benefit both your menta【l and 】/physical we/ll【being&rdquo/;, /so how can/ you have flying free ho【liday that prov\id】es you with all the benefits of being a\ro/und natur】e in the countrysi\de?Tran\sp/ortWhat are the no-fly alternatives?You/ may just gain a lot from the increasingly/ popular conce】pt of slow 【travel an】d f/eel a sense of joy as you 【me/ande】r through sites /【of natura\l beauty】 t【o y【our 【destin【ation.You could always 】sail the seas \on a ferry t】o\ ne】arby 【countries like Fran】ce, Irel】and a\nd \】Holl\and if the idea of a staycation doesn&rs\quo;t float your boat... To get \/to those tra】nqui【l\ spots\ where you can immerse yourself in nature【 why 】not\ rent a【/ \camper va\n wit】h Yescapa if 【you&【rsquo;re not a car owner. Cr\uising on a v\a【n trip would not on/l\y a】llow you t\o take all your home/ comforts w】ith you】/, but it \would a【lso give you 【the freedom to travel far a【n\d wide, without the 】need to fly of course【.A【 cam\per【 vanThe famous Inter/rail Pas】s gives y】ou th】e liberty to tra\vel to 31 differ/ent European countrie/s/, all of which a/re\ home to na\tural beaut/y. What to do onc/e y\ou arrive at the station【? Tra【velling from the s】tation to yo【ur countryside \de/stination could be arrange】d 【usin【g the car 】s【haring App BlaBla Car whic\h has been tried and tested. You 【might make some frien\ds and you won't h\ave the probl】em o\f park/ing the car. Any\ 】of t】hese/ options/ wi】ll hel/p to calm any eco-anx】iety that /you may be feeling. W】hat to【 d\oReconnect with natureA study has proven that any form of immersion in the natural world heighte】ns you\r overal/l we\ll-being and s/timulates you to have a more po/s【i】tive inter\ac】tion】/ with the /w【ider human com】/mun/i】ty. In【 light of th【i】s, many are p】ra\isin】g/ th\e Japanes/e p【ractice of \Fore】st Bathin】g. No,/ \this does not me/an taking a bath in 【between the trees. T/his ancient/ proces【s of relaxation involves】 qu】ietly】/ o\bserving nature, pl】acing yo\urself 【in proximity【 with the\ tr\ee\s/ and breathing deeply. I/f y/ou’re\ looking fo/r a range\ of forests in the UK c】ountryside, F【ore/stry E【ngland provides a searc【h engin\e so y】ou can fi\n/d t【he woods clo【s\e to\ you.A woodlandReconnecting wit【h natur】e can also be done th【rough/ a\ctivit/ies \like ou/tdoor yoga/, walking, wild sw/imming, cycling, wild 【swimming, I could go on.W\hat t\o takeRent a fa】ncy bell te】ntNot staying in】 a cotta】g/e 【or eco-lodg/e? Put/ti【ng u\】p a ca】nvas te【nt (】mayb/e next\ to your r】etr/o camper van) c】ould be /ae/sthetically mindblowing and highly practical/. F】at Lama is a platfo】【rm th/at allows \you\ to rent o】ther p\e/\ople’s cool t\ents that otherwise m\i【ght be 】a larg【e fina】【nci\al investment. \A bell tentBe pr/epared for】 th【e outdoor pi【cnic/sTake your own ba/mboo plates\ and cutlery for those /picnics underneath the shade of a willow tree next 】to a trickling stre\am. That/’s a/ ni\ce Romantic \nove【l【 image isn’t it? But /a bin filled with throwaway plastic forks and plates is not so\ much//. View this post o/n InstagramFrom /o/ur friends in N】o/rway/ @beeco】shop.no【 - Our new Grubware Eat/Drink Tool Kit in Norw\egi\an NYHET! Zero-waste best/ikksettet for den ak【tive ?? Dekker b//ehovene når du vil spise take-away【 i hverdagen, på fest/festival eller drikke juic/e eller smoothie. De【\tte kittet inneho】lde【r 【Spo【rk, gaffe【l/, skje, /kni】v, spi【se【pinn】er,/ sugerør og rengjørings/børste til】 sugerør. Lag/et //【av &os】lash;ko【logisk bambus og op/pbevart i】 en tøypose av &oslas【h;kologisk b】omull ? Mindre \avfal【l i hver【】】dagen】.【 Ja takk ?A post【 /shared b【【y bam【【bu® (\@b/ambuliving) on M【ay 15, 2019 at 2:34pm【 PDTTak\e food aw/ay wi】th youTaking 【food a\【way is a great way to /【prepare for your p/otentially isolated trip to/ the countrysid\e. So why no\t wr】ap /your food 【in\ c【ling film? Well, a\ccord】ing \to BeeBee 【‘more \than 1.2 bil】lion metres, equating \to 745,000 mi【les\ of【 cling fi【lm is used by ho】useho】lds a】cross Britain ev】ery year\&【rsquo;. Be】eswax wrap/s are a【 muc】h more su\stainable alt】\ernative to prolonging the life o【//f 【your foo】d. V/iew this post on Instagr/am\Happ\y /】Spring Equi【nox! ?? Al fresco eat【ing is 【wi】thin reac】h again! Hurray! . . . . . /#InternationalHappinessDay! #springequinox #spri】ng #beeswaxwraps #b\eebeewraps 【#food #alfresco/ #picnic \#outside 【#eating #alfre\scodining #flowers #tulips #plasticfree #zerowa】ste\ #foods【torage #packaging #clingfilmal\ternati】ve #ta\bl【e/ #b【ees #beeswax #organic #c】otton #organiccottonA post sh】ared【 by】 Bee【\Be【e Wraps/ (@beebe】】e】/wraps) 【o/n】 Mar 20\, 2019 at\ 10:30a\m P/DTShare this 】【article 】 More from pla\cesDjWq

7sDPEnvironmental】【ists' anger after Hung【ary cuts d【own EU-protected for\es\t3VoW

t7W4【Coron【【/avirus in Europe:】 W【h】/y has Portu【gal not been as ba】dly hit by /COVID-19 a\s n\e/ighbour【 S\pai【n?N5Jq

kyZtMilk-】made fashion from】【 Tu】sca【nyjRck

PlX3Text siz【eAaAaStar//ting】 a new business/ i\s an/】 exc【iting time, as you emb\ark on\ your entrepr】eneur【ial/ fut【ure w【ith passio【【n and/ dete】rminat【ion\. For many of u【s, n/ew ventures【 often have sust】ainability as a focus. Whether it/&rsqu【o;s【 a dr【ink, a/ clothing brand, jewellery or a café【;, many of us want commit 【to a sustainable ethos as part of our /brand. But what about our //own sustainable effort/s? After all, 】you can’t set up an eco-/focused b\rand and then n\ot pay attentio/n to the sustainabili】ty】 of your own 【working\ day. We asked experts f\or advice o/n how to be a susta】inable】 start-u\p【, from day o】ne\. Make your launch party and gifting\ susta】inablePl【anni】ng an event/ and 】gifts for customers to welco【m【e your n【ew \‘business/ baby&rsq\uo; into/ the【 world is all very well, but you n/eed to do it in 【an /eco-friendly way. Bec E/van】s is author of How to Have a Happy Hustle. She advises, “m】ove\ away fro/m bub【ble wrap envelopes, and th】ink about bi\odegradable \goody【 bag/s – and no glitter balloo/ns! 】/Think about【 plastic in gi/fts and plas\tic waste when giftin\g. It&r\squo;s a】bout showi【ng intention &nd\ash; when you set up a \business\ it’s abo\ut building a community \and workin\g w\ith ea【rly users. Think ‘do【es t【he wor/ld really n】ee/d this?’&rdq\uo;.R/ela】t【ed | 9 susta】inable economy startups a/【i】ming to\ cl【ean up o/ur future 【Make su】stainability\ a &ls】quo;/given’, not a &lsquo/;must】 do/’Jesse Tran and So\n Chu are fellow students from Vietnam who\ 】are s/tar】t】i\ng their own trainer bus】iness and their p】roducts are made f】rom recycle\d coffee cups. \Stu【dying】 in Finland, t【hey saw 】clear】 diffe/rences in 】the way thi】n\gs wer】e produced and /the/ sustaina\ble】 the way of life. The【y&rsq】uo;ve channelled /that into\ their【 brand, RENS. The pair started using an organic cott【on bu\t【 realised this would have/】【\ an environmental impact an】/d so switch】ed to a\ new fabric.\】 &l/dquo;As /millennia【ls, for 【us sustainability shou\ld be a given\,&rdquo/; sa/ys Jess/e. “We want t】o p【lay a 【role as ambassa/dor/s &nda】sh; it【&rs\quo;s /easier to liv【e a sust/ainable life in Finland!”/Rel】ated |The brands launching sunglasses mad/e fr\om human hair, milk bottles \a】nd coffee waste View this post on I\ns】ta【gramRens are【 best sh】ared with \frie【nds! #renshipA post shared by/ Rens Ori\gi【n\al (@rensoriginal) on Aug 19, 2\019 \at 9:0It【】 sits o\ff the coast of Nor】mandy,【 l【ooking like 】a f\airytale castle flo/ating on】 the water.】But for years, the Mont/ Saint Michel ha】s lost a part of its \mysterious solitude【, due t\o an accumulation of /】silt at the island's base.The concret】e causeway\ that conn\ected the island to the ma【inla】\nd pre\/v/ented the wa\te\】r /from flowly /fre】ely aro【und its base.But, no】w 】the sit】e ha\s begun to reclaim its island-like appearance during cert/a【in high tides.\Research on the proje】c\t start\ed in 1995, an【d continued /for more than/ 10 years.】 It then took another 10 year/s to complete th\e majo/r structural/ changes.\【Mar\ie-Agnés Po\ussi/er-Winsb/ack/, Vice-Presi/dent \of Normandy Regional【 【【Council【, said: "【T/hes\e works had【 two aims. First【ly【, to make sure 】that the island/ /coul/d, once a】gain, b\e what it 【wa【s duri】ng previous 【centuries, that is, surro【】unded by the sea and not s\an【d and silt. And second】ly, 【to\ improve\ the】 way we /ma/nage touri【sm."The \main work undertak】en w】as the remov\al of the\ concr/ete causeway. I/t】 was replaced/ with a brid】ge on stilts, the/refore allowi\ng water【 】to trav【el un】derneath it. It conn\ects to an area of solid gr【/ound that becomes sub/mer\g\ed dur/ing high \tide.Th\e o//ld dam o\n the Co【u/e【snon【 w/\as al【so 【d\emol】i\s【hed, and replaced wi\th /a\ new eig/h【t-gated structure that reg【ulates the 【flow between 】the river 】and the sea, which meet in t/h】e ba/y】.Romai】n D/esgu&e】acute;e, who【】 manages the ne】w d【am, explained to E\urone/ws how it works】."The 】old dam was th\ere to limit floodi\ng 】and mar/ine \flooding. The n】ew dam obvi/ously continues to do so, bu】】t it will regen【erate t/he hydro\logi\cal curren\t in the r【iver to erode the sediment. This will【 rem【ove \the sand t【hat accumulated at the 】base of Mont S】aint M】ichel," \he said.To complete th】is facelift, the car parks at t【he/ foot of the island【 h\ave been\ remo/ved, and it can no/w only be reached by a】 free shuttle bus, horse-drawn/ c【ar【riage, or by foot.More t】han 2.5/ m】illion tourists visit the World He/ritage Site every year, but the】 new 【c【hanges m/【e】an that tou【】r】 guid】es【 have had to adap\t.H【ug】o Poulet, a /gu【ide /】【for Les C】he\min\s de la】 Baie, vis\its the bay【 several 【times a da\y with groups of tourists. He /said that \the structural ch\anges have ha/】】d\ an e【ffect on his wor【k."Since the w\orks hav】e finishe【d, the ground leve】l has drop【ped, 【the sea is moving【 faste\r and no\w 【we \have 】the Cu\esnon pa【ss【ing on 】e/a/\ch side. \We do shorter outing【s, we adapt to\ th【e sea and we manage to 】juggle】\ tha】t,"【 he 【said.The project cost a total of /&【euro;184 mi【llion. Of th】at, €85 million was funded by the Fre\nch government, and €21.5 million was financed by the EU's cohesi】on 【pol/icy,】 w\hich took charge of part of the co/nst\ruction of the dam and its hydraulics.1212121212121212Share this articleCopy/past\e the article video embed l\ink below:CopyShareTweetShare\sendShareTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareSendShareSh/areMore aboutMont-Saint-MichelEnvironmen/tal protectionTou】rismFrance【 \ 【 \Browse today/9;s tagsa\m P/DT【Think ab/out【 the entire prod/uction chainSo you&/r】squo;ve c/hosen your start-up./ Now to find】 a way to produce】 the 【product】. Sustaina\bility needs to be considered from start /to 【f\inish. Paul Turton i/s the Man】aging Dire】ct\or at Pact, a lead\ing speciality coffee s\erv】ice. He reveals that \they know customers are more likely/ to choo/se a brand or product that h】】【as【 purpose at the he\art of the business, so you should 【consider making this a k】ey /part of your company proposition.“S/ustainability is one 【of our\ core values, from t/he \farming wor】kfor/c】e in t\he co/untries/ w】【e buy our/ coffee/ from, to the /far/ming pra\ctices, ethics, shippin/g【, wa【/rehous】e【\s and roasting of the co】ffee,” he says. &l】dquo;It wouldn't be r】ig】ht to ask peop/le to work in 】a【 way that doesn't s】how us up】\holding our own standard/s - /no ma/tte/r the 【size of our busines\s.&rdqu\o;Jesse and【 Son fr\om Rens agree that their biggest tip【 is to 】find 【a g/ood/ sustainable base】. They work /from Aalto universit】y. &ldq】uo;Th【e lights are/ all aut/omat/ic, and\ everything is optimis/ed【/\,” sa】ys Jesse.Is your office space susta/i/nability-f【r】iendly?According to Bec Evans, “happiness is the j\ump】ing-off】 point【 【【for【 becoming a\ &lsq【uo;si】\d】e h/ustler’, and one of】 the reaso/ns si/de hus\tles are growing 】so 】much is \b】ecause you】 can work /from【 /anywhere\.” So\ that/&】rsquo;s a g】ood place to s\tart 【&n】dash; is yo】ur chosen place /of work】 sustaina】ble? Whether it’s at home】, a 【co/-w】ork/ing【 space o\r ren/【ted of\fic\e, y\ou need】 t\o c\onsider everything from the recycling p】\olicy to energ/y use.Susan Steven\s, /a CEO and Founder o【f/ 【M/a/de 【with R【espect ad/ds, “balancing between business objectives /and sus【tainability is ve【ry hard】 in the modern wo【】r【ld. \Our current【 business \model i/s b【ased \on con\】/sumerism, brands fighting for more an\d more】 sales, making customers buy thing【s they don【’t n【e】ed and have \t/【o th\row t【hem awa/y 】i/n a mon】\th or two.\ App】r\oxi\m】ately 1.3 bil\lion tons o/f 【wa【ste is 】prod】uced globally each year, this numb【er is ex【pected to increase to 2.2 billion tons p/\e/【r year by 2025】. This is alarming.”R】elated /| 5 s】tunning examples/ of/ g\reen architecture around the worldCommit to /recyclingThis may f\ee\l li\k\e /a more obvious one,\ but recycling can get forgotten 【when \you&rsquo/;re wonderi/ng abo【ut the provenance of the /cotton for those new bags you’re mak【ing\. Keep/ a kee【n eye on the re\cycling \opt】ions at your wor【kplace and of your prod\uct, expert【s sa】y. Paul Tur】to\n/ adds, &ld【quo\;it&rs】quo;s good 【to get into good /habits fr【om t/he start, then when the busi\ness/ gro】ws, it’s already ingrained in t】he cult/ure/. People don&r\squo;t o\ften r】ealise【 you can 】even \recycle used coffee grounds, it’\s best\【\ to seek out/ sup/pli【er/s【 who 】can help you do this, we use First Mile\ Rec【\ycling】 a\n【d Bio-Bean 【or simply \get a compost【 bin in the o【ffice.&r/dq/uo;First Mile founder】 and CE\O, Br】uce Bratley, adds, “when it 【com】es to recycling, it【's【 i】mport\ant to remember that no【t all was【te companies deal wit\h wa】ste in the same w【ay. 】It'\s essent【ial t\o ide\nt/ify one tha\t will\ continue you】r sustainabi\li【ty effo】rts aft【er you/r waste leaves yo\ur pr】emises to 【avoid it ending up in landfill sites where it will pr【o【duce green】h【ouses gases, such as metha】ne.”\Fi【】nd people who】 are on the sa\me sustainab】ility /page as \you\Wo/\rking with like-minded peop【le will mean y【ou】 develop \a st】rong sustain】ability】 mantra across the d\ay and into the future. David Ke】lly, Gener\al Manager \for \Eu【rope, Middle East and】 Africa a【t Deputy】, a co【mpa】\ny /that w\orks with】 lots of start-ups, s\ays, &\ldquo;to grow/ sustainably and /re/tain talent, you need/ to b】rin\g people on the j】ou/r/ney with you.】 Pay th/em pro【perly a【nd\ on time and prove wor】k w/il/l fit into their\ lif【e. In/ve\sting【 in tools that allow you to /d】o【 thi】s wi\l【l bu】ild 【trust amongst a dedicated work【f【】o【rce who /will be your en\gi】/ne fo/r grow/th.”/Buy 【second】 hand\ supplies and th】ink about packagingHow exciting is it when yo】u】 start\ a ne【】w business t【】o 【go all out on the stationa/ry, fun new pens, plant pots, 】desk ch\intz and \fancy envelope【s? Right? B】ut all these things are sustaina\bi【lity nightmares. You 【know a【bo/ut fast fashion, but you also ne】ed to【 b/e awa\re of &ls】quo\;fast stationary’\./ Step away from the p/en\s - you’\ve /go】t lots at home already./A/nd that goes for /machines as\ \well as pens, adds Jason Dow\nes, MD at PowWowNow,】 &ldquo\;when businesses are sourcing /off】ice】 equipme】nt, the/y sho】ul\d s【eek appliances with \a】n ENERGY 】STAR label, which【 indica\tes that the equipment\ has achiev】ed ener/gy efficiency \sta【ndards set by the EU./ 】Computers, for example, us/e 30-65 percent les\s electricity, while there are also\ greener alternatives for a lo【t of t】echno】l\ogy, such as/ energy-【efficient l\i\ghtb\u】lbs or solar-pow\ered】 smart】 speakers.&】【rdquo/;】Ros【alind Rathou【se run】s a s】ustainable cookery \school.】 She says, “when setti】ng up/ the \office of your ne\w bus\iness or start-】up,\ don&\rsquo;t be tem/pted to buy everythin/g new/. 【\Recycle where you can, use Fo【\rest/\ Stew/a】rdship Cou】ncil produc【ts and/ choose s\ustainable energy provider】s. Incorporate 】sustainability processe【s from d\ay one an\d emphasise/ the im【portance of waste management and re】ducin/g plastic.”Think about y【our energy supplierBills【 aren’t the mo\st glamorou】s t】/】opic, but choose the right ene\rgy sup】plier; you could save money as well as the p\lanet. B/ruce Bratl\ey ex/plai\/ns, “there i【s a growing】 r】ange 【of fully renewable energy pro\viders that 】can /pow【er your busi】ness withou【t creatin】g 【/extra/ greenhouse】 gas emissions, and even green web【 hosti/ng companies with renew【abl/e energy a】nd carbon offsetting s】ch【emes. Bu【sinesses can\ sav/e resourc\es】 by ensu【ring th】at they're signed up to pa【perle【ss【 billing for all of t\h】eir bills.【 Devel/oping gre【en habits in the 【workplace is/ easy\ and ca\n have a \signi】fica【nt impa】ct, f\or exampl\e, m【akin/g sure lig\hts and screens aren't being left on】 needlessl/y, using publi\c transpor】t to】 /g】et to me\etings and making sure e【veryo\ne \has easy access to】 【recycling bin/s.”Th】ink\ abo【ut em【otiona\l susta【inability, tooOnce you】’ve done /all you can】 to be sustain\able with the pr【acti/cal things, you need to th】ink about your own mental well【being, to【o, /adds Bec Evans. “A\ lo\t of people set up side h【ustles because/ they 】are solving problems in【 some way a/nd I s】peak to【 a l\ot【 of peop\le in areas of health \and mental wellbeing who fee\l the pro】ble\ms 】/they see a/ren’t bein【g solved. /Talk to customers /and /ask/ them wh\at they think./ Be t\rue\ to your values. If sustain【ability is something that mo/tivat/es y】ou then it&\rsquo;s important to】 check y【ou’re in 】l】/i【ne with your 【/own va\lues.”W】ords:/ Jenny S【ta【llardShare/\ this article M【o/re from lif/evUJS

mwIGOne of Greece&rsquo\;s 】【most】 popular tourist d\esti/n\atio/】ns is at risk of ecological and economical disaster as drilling【 companie\s pr\epar】e 】to exploit /thou【sands of kilometres of】 \la/nd, the World Wide Fund for N\atu\re【 (WWF) has】 w】arned.The Gre/ek government has allocated/\ 17/,000 square kilometr【es of Zakynthos to o】il/ c\【ompanies, leadi【ng to activi//sts to 【warn of t【he potential effects drilling fo【r o/il and gas could have.&l/dquo;A】bou】】t a third 【of \】the GDP of the Ionian islands comes from tourism. S】o,【 im/ag【ine t/he scenario【 【of a/ minor】】 or greater【 oil accident and what d【oes that】 mean f【or these is】l/ands】,&rdquo】; said De】】mitres】 Karavellas, t/he\ /direc/\tor-gener/al of WWF Greece.To 【hel】p 【raise awa\reness of the issue, the【 WWF France /sailing boat ‘Bl】ue Panda’ is tra/\vel】ling【/ the Ionian Sea, informing 【islanders at destinations such as Zante, Itha\/ca and K/【e\falonia about the problem.WWF is particularly concerned about the protecti/【on/ of \the loggerhe】ad turtl【e.S/hare this articleCopy/paste the article video embe】\d link below:CopyShar/eTwe【e\tSharesend/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSen\dShareS】hareShareSe/ndSh/areShareYou mi/g/ht also like/ \ / Europe \acc【used of 'turning a b【li\nd eye' to risk /of corona【virus in migrant camps / 】 Greece use【s】 state TV to\【 teach sc】hool children during coronavi】rus loc/kdown \ \ \ / 【 / Migrants arriving in Greece 】say the】y have no pr\otection again\st coronavirus \ 【 Mo【re aboutGreeceEcologica【l【【 cris/is//WWFEnviron/men【tal prote【ctionNa【tur【al\ 】gasOil 【market Brow\se to/day/'】s tagsrXDB

49fsText sizeAaAaThe d/ebate arou\nd the sustainability of le\a【ther p\rodu】ction is g【ai/ning m【omentum in th【】e fashion/【 industry. In 】recent y【ears, ra/ising awareness around the\ ecological impact o】f producin/g le】athe】r i/tems】 has prompt\ed a gro【w】】ing number of brands to rec\onside】r their u【se of the fa【bri】c in】 th】e/ir fashio【n lines/, as well as it has【 pushe/d new actors to \co】me up w\ith innovative solutions to creat\e more ecol【og\ically-【fr/】iendly le\ather/.The ec】ologica【l cost of leather productio】nT/he initial r】aw\ material for l\eather 【producti】/on is animal【 skin\ which orig【inates from ani】mal farming, a pro】ce\ss w\h【ich】 【usually rel】ie【s on huge amounts of feed, pasturel/and【, water, and】 fossil fuels with ne/gative ecologic\al impacts. However, leathe【r /is 】on】l】y a by-pro/duct in thi】s process, the animals being primarily raised for their me\【at/.Where/ the e【nvir【onmental cos/t of leat】her product\io\n really beco】mes visibl【e is at the /stage of the\ transformatio【n of the animal skin into the f】inal prod/uct. Since /leather is a perishable material, a number 】of methods have been used to st【abi【//lise t\【he raw mate【ri\al, and make it m\ore durable via t/h【e tanning process.This 】】is an indus【trial process that【 typically involves 【many ch\e】mical com】pounds and uses up a lot of water and energy. A number of hazardous mat\eri/】als a\nd /p】ollutants are/ releas\ed i】n 】the envir【onmen【t s\uch 【as mineral salts, lime slud】ge, sulfides, fo\rmaldeh\yd\e, coal-tar de/ri【vatives, a】nd various oil【s, dyes, and finishes (some o/f them cyani【de-bas【ed) are employed. . Water \i】s u【sed in】 high quantit】【y as a s/olvent, which is all the more problematic that a significa【nt n【umbe\r of tan【neries/ are lo【cate】\d in ar\id regions \of the world.To a】ddress these i【ssues, \the dev\elopment of new technologies t【o\ 】provide】 more ef【fici\ent processes for【 the pr\oduction of le】ather【 is under】way. So are efforts to promote the production of synth】etic leath\e\r, /w/hi】c/h could offer an interes【ting【】 alternative to th【e fas/hi【on indu【stry.Cow lea】\ther vs synthetic leatherFor 】change 】to happe】n in the leather i/ndustry tho】ugh, rob/ust assessme/nts of t\he/ dif/feren】t m】ethods us\ed in the ta【nn】ing process/ and compari\sons betw【ee\n cow lea】ther an\d other materi】als, are ne【ed\ed.Researchers have assessed the e【cological impact of different ta【nning methods to se【e if on【e was prefe】rable in t【】erms of its environment/al footprint.】 One o】f the techniques 【that some tanneries \employ to reduce the u【se\ of harmful che】micals is to 】resort to vege/table-tann【i【ng.This is an artisanal process that tak/【es advantage of /the t】an【ni\c acids na【】turally found i/】【】n some pl\】ants, by using the/ barks, branches,】 lea【ves or even s】\ome fruits in s/ome specific te\chniques. 【It is /【t\houg【ht to be more 【environmental/ly friendly than oth/e/r methods of processing /cow l\eather.To find out more,/ a 2017 stu【dy comp【a\r/ed this 【m【eth/o/d to more t\radit\ional 【methods using chemi】\cals suc\h a【\【s c/hromium-】/tanning, looking at th\e carbon, water, and energy 【footprint o\f the vege】\table】 】and chromium leather pro】ces/sing 】technology in 12 selecte/d tanneries in seven dif/ferent coun】/tries worldwide.The scientists act【【u】a【lly fo【und no sign/if【ican】t d\iff【erences in the fo【otpr【int of vegetabl/】e 】and chromium leather processes. Ho【wever, they cauti】on that this type of research is /challenging to do and /that tak/i】ng steps to improve the leather ind/ustry need to be base\d\ on evidence\-based resea\r【ch.“\Each tannery proved to be 【very individual, a\nd the\refore 】att【empting to pe/rform this type of analysis /without si【mply producin/g【 meaningle【ss generalities is 【a cha\llenge\ f【or companies, researcher\s, and regulator/s,&r】dquo; the 】researchers say. While【 /there is/\ little evide\nce \then that cho】osing a spec\ific m【ethod of leather tanning may be 【bette\r fo【】r the environment, \the evidence in favour of producing syntheti\c lea\ther ins】tead of leat】【her from /an\imals i\s mounting.Th】e 201】【 Pulse of T【he 】Fash/ion Industry Report published by the Global】 Fashion Agenda and The Bos/ton Con/\s】ult【ing Grou/p, was instrumental in highlig【ht【ing the\ idea that the prod】uctio/n/ of 】synthetic leather i\s less d】amaging /to the \environment/. It offer/ed 【some \of th【e most robus【t 】conclusions 【o】n th/e subject to date,】 p【ro】mpting\ 【stake】holders in the】 fashion indus/t\ry to switch to more ecological options, including synthetic leat【he】r【.Th】e /rep】o【rt indee\d/ showed \that among /all the materia】ls used in the fashion \ind】ustry, an】imal leather ranked thi【rd as the main contributor to global\/ warmi\ng. I【t also came first as the 【most damaging mat【erial/ when resea\rchers looked 【at th\】e issue of eutrophicat【】ion : its man【ufa】ctu【re was【 associated w】ith a relea/se of excessive chemical compounds and nu/trients/ into bodi【es of w】ater, frequently due to runoff from】 th【e land, causing\ dense growth of plant l\if【e\ and deat\/h /of 】anima【l\ life from lack of 【oxygen.More impor】tantl【y, the report found that synthetic leather /had on average on】ly /【a third of the environme】n】tal \impact of【【 cow leather. 】Switching to/ alternative materi】\【/a\/ls, including synthetic leather【, could thus directl\y improve a p\roduct&rs【quo;s 】ecological foot/prin】t.Gro】wing number of initiativesThe \mes【s【age【 has progressively\ been recei\ved\ and a growing numbe\r of initiatives i/llustrat】e the mo/ve to abandon cow l】eath】er for its synt】hetic a【lternatives. Exa\mples of a\dva/nces rely o【n the development a】nd the us【e of non/-convent/iona/【l fib/e\rs made fr【om substances /su【ch as c/itrus/ juice, grape 】plan/ts, or kelp, bioengin/eered \/leather, and the furt】her【 /promotion of bast f【ibers.In its m】】o/st re\ce/nt 2018 edition, the Pulse of Th【e Fashion In/dustry Report presen【te\d a num\ber of projects carri/ed by companies dedicated to su\stainable fashion and t【o pro/ducing synthetic【 le【at【her at the lowest ecological c/ost.Mi\lan-based compa【ny Vegea \is fo\r in【stance working to crea【te leather that is 】m/a【de entirely fr【o【m【】 grapes skin, stalks, an\d seeds and for th/is, it【 won th【e 20】17 H&M Global Change Award. Another good e\xa【【mple is the company known 【a】s 【Provenance Biofabrics which pr】oduces b】ioengineere【d leather【 by pr】ogramming /collagen molec】ules to self-assem\ble.These are 】just some of the initiative【s/ under d\eve【lopment, \and the f/i】eld is now undergoing a period of inno】】va【】tion and dynamism】. /Exactly】 what 2019 will bring is 【uncle【ar】, \b【ut one thing is cer【tain\ : the leather industry 【is/\ profoundly changing to b/ecome more sustainable.Writer: L\éa Su【rugueShare th】is article 【 】 More from stylefO8p

n78wTe】xt sizeAaAaIn th\e shadow of \t【he f】irst/ a】nnive】rsary of/ jo【urnalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 】murder an\d\ amid escalating tensions in neighbouring Yemen, Saudi Arabi\a has opened its /doors to tourism for 】the first time.The/ fac】t is,/ Saudi has been cut off from many West\erners until】/ no【w. A\ poor i【mage in the press, alon【\gside al】legations of human 】rights abuses have put some off the idea. /That’\s \not to mentio\n 】【【the dif【ficulties in getti\n】g a vi/sa】.Now, however/, the obstacle of the 】vis/a ha\s been /removed, after 【Saudi 【/announ/ce】d its new t】ourism scheme in Septembe\r. The new tourist v】isa【 allows visi/tors from 49 countries – includin\g 】all EU n/ations i】n 【addition 】to the US/, Canada, China, Japa【n】 and 】Rus【sia among other【s】 – t\o pay \on arrival for a 90-day tourism visa/.\ It comes at a cost of 440/ S【AR plus VAT, equivalent to £9/&eu/ro;106/【9.Saudi is turning t\\o tourism in place of oilEu\ronews / \Rachel Gr\ahamThe 】】tourism board hopes the n\e【w v【isa will make it easier for people \to\ discover the land for themselv/es. And it&rsquo【;【s fair to sa\y there /is much m】ore to/ 】discover than \many realise.Read mo\re |【An unfilt【ered【 g【uid】e to getti【ng a/round in】 Saudi A【rabiaMuch of Saudi Arabia/ /wa/s un】der【wa【ter 】mil\lions of 【years a【go, and it s】h/ows\ in the landscape wit/h r/ocks ju】tting out ac【ross th】e dese【【\rt, forming wha\t used to be shelv】【es and cor】al 【reefs. Meanw】hile, the Red Sea coast as it is now is 】\a sight simil/ar to that of the Maldives. There are more than\ /1,100 tin/y, and\ com【p】letely undevelope】d, 】【/is【\lands that】 【】are home /to w【onders【 of【 n/ature.Madein Saleh, near Al UlaEuronews / R】a【chel GrahamThe western coastline fe【ature\s 】】island】s reminiscent of the Mal/divesEuronews / Rachel【\ G】rahamBut for Westerners to unco/ver th\e s\ights and sounds of 】Sa/udi, t】】】hey&r【squo;d have to be convinced that either their negat\ive percept】ions have been ex】a//ggerated or that the country has changed. \So, how liberal【 is Sau【di Arab【ia a【】bout【 to /become in its bid 【】to e【nchant\】 /tourists? A\nd at what co/st?Crown Prince Mohammed B】in S\alman is\ 】said to be behind the drive /f/or Saudi to ditc】h【 its reliance o/【n oil,\ /an】d move tow\ards other form】s of】 in/com/e. A shining jewel of that 【plan is for Saudi Arabia/ /to/ be/come【 a hub for internatio/\nal tou\rism.Supe】r citi【esIt 【has【 experience of tourism as the site \of 【the world&rsq【uo;s\ largest/ pilgrimage si\te at Mec/ca, seeing nearly 1.9 million】 non-Saudi Musli/ms make the Hajj\ pil】grimage over /the course of just a few days la【st yea【r. But no【w, the coun\tr】y】 is gearing up\/ to position i/t【self as a \luxury destination】.It is spending hundreds of/ billio】n【s【 \on \new i/n\frastruc【ture and a trio of gig【aprojects th/ro\u【ghout\ the country to \m】ake it more appealing/ to disc\erning visitors.\ These 】audacious pl/ans include 】building Saudi Arabia’s fir】st ski slop/e ins【i\de Riyadh】&rsq\u】o;s upcoming Mall Of 【Arabi\a shop\ping 】cent/re, 】\and creating the Neom super cit【y on Saudi’s Re【d Se\a coast.What wil\l \soon b】e Neom is \cur\ren\tly part of 【an/ 800km stretch of coastline s\outh /】o【f t】he bord】er with/ Jordan. A\】s it stands,\ it /doesn’\t ye【t feature a single fiv】e】-star hotel or r/es/o】rt.M/ultiple so/urc】es \\t【old Euronews Living th\at the Saudi go】v】ern/ment】 was in “advanced talks&rdq\uo; /to allow】 alcohol in /the country, 】nea/ring\ the /stage of being “rea】dy to sign” agre】ements /permitting alco】】hol in resorts such as N【eom. Currently possessi\on of or trade in alcohol is prohibi/ted, /】leading to 【se\v】ere punishments including imprisonment fo\r those cau/g\ht flouting the rules【.Shou/ld thos【e new】 r\egu/lat】【i】o\ns com】e to fruition, bo\oze wil【l become jus】t a\ small pa/rt o】【f the attract】io】n.The gove\r/【n/ment has said it is c\omm】itted t/o maintaining S/audi&rsquo】/;【s \uniqu【e s【/el\ling point\【, which bring//s together landscapes like t\hose of the U/S’s grand canyon】, the Maldives&rsquo/;/ seas and 】ancient c】ultural attra/ctions. T/his\ 【would mean sustainable】 tou\rism manag【\ement and premium positioning, sa】/y offic【ials.Al Ul】a is set to become 'th\e world's biggest liv\ing mus】eum'Euronews /【 Rachel GrahamS】ustainability/“Once we identify an e/nvironme】nt, we pu/t a coastal management plan into place,&rd【quo; s【ays Captain 】Ahmed/【 Shaker, associate director of the Marina &【amp; Yac】ht Club at King Abdul/lah Economic Centr/e north of Jeddah.“So if we】 \find a be】/ach //w\here turt/les nest, it&】rsquo/;ll be/ of\f-limits except to very small【 n\umbers of conserv【ationist\s and eco-tourists w\ho’ll access the】m in a way that doesn’t distu【rb the wildlife. We’re e】xpecting sport fishing to becom//e a big\ part of the tourism push, and【 there i/t will b】e all about catc\h and r/elease.&rdquo】;Saudi Arabia plans to【 a/ttra\ct tour】\ists to th\【e Jedd】ah coastline for /sp/ort fi】shing \【and divingKAECAmaala is a zero carbon/ resort coming to Saudi A【r】abi\a's /west coastAmaalaShaker i/s passionate abo【ut p/reser【vin/g /\the ocean/s \surrounding hi【s home【land. “/Working】 a】s a scuba instructor in Sharm El Sh】e/ikh in th】e late 80s, I saw th/e transformatio【n a\s it became a dest/ination】 【for mass tour/ism and watched as the co】rals got so rui】ned, it wa\s h】ard】ly/ w/orth diving anymo\r\e. That’\s when 】\it b/ecame a nightlife resort instead, be【cau【se 【the n】atu【ral be/auty was gone】.”Inla\nd, a project【 named 【Amaala is ai/ming for a carbon n\eutra\l buil【d/ and final【 result. It is set to feature a 【mar】ine conservation/ \ce/ntre and state of/ the art h】ea/th facil【ities in addition to luxury, sol/a】r-powered ho/tels.R/ead more | How do you make/ 】a /】luxury tourist【 destin\ation zero carbon?T【he kind of pers【\o】n likely to /make use of these /facilities are advent】urers 】- those 【\a/ttracted by t\he culture and unknown qua】ntity t\hat makes Saudi Ar【abi【a a mysterious destination, says UK based tou\/rism co【【nsultant /Roger Goodacre.\The\ coast】al region of Tabu】k is set to b【ecome encom】passed by NeomEuronews / Rachel Graham"/Saudi 】is hardly i/n danger of be\coming a mass/ tourism destination," he says. "It's someon/e who wa【nts to explor【e【【 things they\【 haven't b\een able\ to before who will visit, and there 】will be some drawn by the/ Red Sea】 Coa\st. It's p】erhaps /【the 【last unspoiled di/ving d【estination of its kind on Ear\th."Cur【rently, he's working on a project to 】quadrupl【e the n【umber of pilgrims visiting Mecca \each year, /but sees n/o object to non-Musli\ms enj】oying\ it. "Most 】people don't let their political views】 colo\ur t】heir choi】ce of holiday destinations."/How Western】 wi\ll Saudi/ go?Tac\o Bell res\】taurants, Domino's 【pizza jo【in【ts, Dunkin' \Donu\ts coffee shops a】lr【eady \line/ the /streets【 o】f Riyadh/, provin】g the Saudi p\eople /have】 already develo\ped quite/ a taste for some Western \s\t\aple】s.Meanwhil】e/, liberalisation is well underw【/ay, according to Good】acre. "Th\e religi\ou/s police [the mutaween] d【on't have anywhere【 near as much po/w】er as they \used 【to," he】 tells 】】Euronews Living."S/ocially, it\'s consid/erably more relaxe】d now, es【pecially in Jeddah【 where you're less likel\y】 to see he/a【d 【coverings, a/nd more likely to see w】om】e/n【 driving, cycling】 a/long the prome【nades and mixing of\ sexes. I【t wou\ld all have been \unthinka】ble/ until r】ecently."Read mo/re |\Trio of \eco hotels to open/ n/ext doo/r t】o 【UN【E\SCO World Heritag】e siteThe r】e【pressive】 stat\e that 【many envision is/ open【 to further cha/nge, add】】s Ahmad A\l-Khateeb, c【ha】ir\man 【of the】 Saudi Commission for Tourism and Natio\nal Heritage.“Once you o/pen the doors, it’s ve\ry difficult【 to close \them 【once more,” he says. 】After all,【 the commission w/ant \visitors to be “surprise】d and【 delighted by the trea\【sures we hav\e to sha/re&rdq/u\o;. H】e counts among them\ “five UNESCO /World Heritage S/ites,\ a vibr/ant/ local cu】lt\ure and bre】athtaking natural beauty&\rdquo;.Ar/chi【tecture in t/he capital is 【thor/oughly mod【ern\/Amr AlMadani, CEO of /the【 Royal Com\missi/on fo【r AlUla, stresses that you h【ave to have 【li【v/\ed in Saudi Arabia long e\nough to see t/he change, but po】【ints \to lifting the【 】ban on【 w【omen driving l/ast year as a pivot】al moment.Now, he wan//ts 】to mak/e AlUla - \which form\ed t】he s/o/uth\er【n h/ub \of the ancient\ Nabatean civilisation - t【he “large【st living mu】seum in the world&【rdquo;. Opening to tourism for th【em【 means revealing【 a place th\【/at connects humans, culture and 】nature."We think of AlUla as \Petra plus," he sa/ys, referring to the】 Nab/atean c\api】tal region in Jord/an 【that has become a hub f】or hist【\ory b/uffs and tourists.And 【\th【e question of the coveri\ng u/p? It is per】】haps /one of\ th【e first images【 conjured for man】y when think of Saudi Ar【abia. However wearing the \abaya isn't manda\tory for f\oreign【 visitors【, says AlMadani. "But the type of tourist we're exp】ect/ing to attract is respectful of the cul】】/ture.&rd\quo;Ultimately, \opening the floodgates to tourism wh\ile maint【】ai【ni】ng/ respect 】for Saudi&r\squo;s cul/tural heritage and natu【ral env【ironment may be to】ugh. But it is the challenge its government ha【s chos/en. With their confidence 【bol\stered by the pre\mium p/rice po【int an/d curren】t【 dear【th of wat/ering holes likely to s\c【are /of/f bargain hunters, they【 may yet succeed\.【Madein Saleh, 【near Al UlaEuronews / Rachel Graha/mShare【 】this a\rticle 【【 More from placeszA7p

M5IhIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gs02aD

1.OItgText sizeAaAaThe d/ebate arou\nd the sustainability of le\a【ther p\rodu】ction is g【ai/ning m【omentum in th【】e fashion/【 industry. In 】recent y【ears, ra/ising awareness around the\ ecological impact o】f producin/g le】athe】r i/tems】 has prompt\ed a gro【w】】ing number of brands to rec\onside】r their u【se of the fa【bri】c in】 th】e/ir fashio【n lines/, as well as it has【 pushe/d new actors to \co】me up w\ith innovative solutions to creat\e more ecol【og\ically-【fr/】iendly le\ather/.The ec】ologica【l cost of leather productio】nT/he initial r】aw\ material for l\eather 【producti】/on is animal【 skin\ which orig【inates from ani】mal farming, a pro】ce\ss w\h【ich】 【usually rel】ie【s on huge amounts of feed, pasturel/and【, water, and】 fossil fuels with ne/gative ecologic\al impacts. However, leathe【r /is 】on】l】y a by-pro/duct in thi】s process, the animals being primarily raised for their me\【at/.Where/ the e【nvir【onmental cos/t of leat】her product\io\n really beco】mes visibl【e is at the /stage of the\ transformatio【n of the animal skin into the f】inal prod/uct. Since /leather is a perishable material, a number 】of methods have been used to st【abi【//lise t\【he raw mate【ri\al, and make it m\ore durable via t/h【e tanning process.This 】】is an indus【trial process that【 typically involves 【many ch\e】mical com】pounds and uses up a lot of water and energy. A number of hazardous mat\eri/】als a\nd /p】ollutants are/ releas\ed i】n 】the envir【onmen【t s\uch 【as mineral salts, lime slud】ge, sulfides, fo\rmaldeh\yd\e, coal-tar de/ri【vatives, a】nd various oil【s, dyes, and finishes (some o/f them cyani【de-bas【ed) are employed. . Water \i】s u【sed in】 high quantit】【y as a s/olvent, which is all the more problematic that a significa【nt n【umbe\r of tan【neries/ are lo【cate】\d in ar\id regions \of the world.To a】ddress these i【ssues, \the dev\elopment of new technologies t【o\ 】provide】 more ef【fici\ent processes for【 the pr\oduction of le】ather【 is under】way. So are efforts to promote the production of synth】etic leath\e\r, /w/hi】c/h could offer an interes【ting【】 alternative to th【e fas/hi【on indu【stry.Cow lea】\ther vs synthetic leatherFor 】change 】to happe】n in the leather i/ndustry tho】ugh, rob/ust assessme/nts of t\he/ dif/feren】t m】ethods us\ed in the ta【nn】ing process/ and compari\sons betw【ee\n cow lea】ther an\d other materi】als, are ne【ed\ed.Researchers have assessed the e【cological impact of different ta【nning methods to se【e if on【e was prefe】rable in t【】erms of its environment/al footprint.】 One o】f the techniques 【that some tanneries \employ to reduce the u【se\ of harmful che】micals is to 】resort to vege/table-tann【i【ng.This is an artisanal process that tak/【es advantage of /the t】an【ni\c acids na【】turally found i/】【】n some pl\】ants, by using the/ barks, branches,】 lea【ves or even s】\ome fruits in s/ome specific te\chniques. 【It is /【t\houg【ht to be more 【environmental/ly friendly than oth/e/r methods of processing /cow l\eather.To find out more,/ a 2017 stu【dy comp【a\r/ed this 【m【eth/o/d to more t\radit\ional 【methods using chemi】\cals suc\h a【\【s c/hromium-】/tanning, looking at th\e carbon, water, and energy 【footprint o\f the vege】\table】 】and chromium leather pro】ces/sing 】technology in 12 selecte/d tanneries in seven dif/ferent coun】/tries worldwide.The scientists act【【u】a【lly fo【und no sign/if【ican】t d\iff【erences in the fo【otpr【int of vegetabl/】e 】and chromium leather processes. Ho【wever, they cauti】on that this type of research is /challenging to do and /that tak/i】ng steps to improve the leather ind/ustry need to be base\d\ on evidence\-based resea\r【ch.“\Each tannery proved to be 【very individual, a\nd the\refore 】att【empting to pe/rform this type of analysis /without si【mply producin/g【 meaningle【ss generalities is 【a cha\llenge\ f【or companies, researcher\s, and regulator/s,&r】dquo; the 】researchers say. While【 /there is/\ little evide\nce \then that cho】osing a spec\ific m【ethod of leather tanning may be 【bette\r fo【】r the environment, \the evidence in favour of producing syntheti\c lea\ther ins】tead of leat】【her from /an\imals i\s mounting.Th】e 201】【 Pulse of T【he 】Fash/ion Industry Report published by the Global】 Fashion Agenda and The Bos/ton Con/\s】ult【ing Grou/p, was instrumental in highlig【ht【ing the\ idea that the prod】uctio/n/ of 】synthetic leather i\s less d】amaging /to the \environment/. It offer/ed 【some \of th【e most robus【t 】conclusions 【o】n th/e subject to date,】 p【ro】mpting\ 【stake】holders in the】 fashion indus/t\ry to switch to more ecological options, including synthetic leat【he】r【.Th】e /rep】o【rt indee\d/ showed \that among /all the materia】ls used in the fashion \ind】ustry, an】imal leather ranked thi【rd as the main contributor to global\/ warmi\ng. I【t also came first as the 【most damaging mat【erial/ when resea\rchers looked 【at th\】e issue of eutrophicat【】ion : its man【ufa】ctu【re was【 associated w】ith a relea/se of excessive chemical compounds and nu/trients/ into bodi【es of w】ater, frequently due to runoff from】 th【e land, causing\ dense growth of plant l\if【e\ and deat\/h /of 】anima【l\ life from lack of 【oxygen.More impor】tantl【y, the report found that synthetic leather /had on average on】ly /【a third of the environme】n】tal \impact of【【 cow leather. 】Switching to/ alternative materi】\【/a\/ls, including synthetic leather【, could thus directl\y improve a p\roduct&rs【quo;s 】ecological foot/prin】t.Gro】wing number of initiativesThe \mes【s【age【 has progressively\ been recei\ved\ and a growing numbe\r of initiatives i/llustrat】e the mo/ve to abandon cow l】eath】er for its synt】hetic a【lternatives. Exa\mples of a\dva/nces rely o【n the development a】nd the us【e of non/-convent/iona/【l fib/e\rs made fr【om substances /su【ch as c/itrus/ juice, grape 】plan/ts, or kelp, bioengin/eered \/leather, and the furt】her【 /promotion of bast f【ibers.In its m】】o/st re\ce/nt 2018 edition, the Pulse of Th【e Fashion In/dustry Report presen【te\d a num\ber of projects carri/ed by companies dedicated to su\stainable fashion and t【o pro/ducing synthetic【 le【at【her at the lowest ecological c/ost.Mi\lan-based compa【ny Vegea \is fo\r in【stance working to crea【te leather that is 】m/a【de entirely fr【o【m【】 grapes skin, stalks, an\d seeds and for th/is, it【 won th【e 20】17 H&M Global Change Award. Another good e\xa【【mple is the company known 【a】s 【Provenance Biofabrics which pr】oduces b】ioengineere【d leather【 by pr】ogramming /collagen molec】ules to self-assem\ble.These are 】just some of the initiative【s/ under d\eve【lopment, \and the f/i】eld is now undergoing a period of inno】】va【】tion and dynamism】. /Exactly】 what 2019 will bring is 【uncle【ar】, \b【ut one thing is cer【tain\ : the leather industry 【is/\ profoundly changing to b/ecome more sustainable.Writer: L\éa Su【rugueShare th】is article 【 】 More from styleFXIk

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4.rWUHText sizeAaAaLondon-based desi【gn fi\rm Pries】tmanGoode has launc】hed a s\ustainably/ made in-flight meal tray meant for pass\engers, a】】s pa【r/t【 o】f its ‘Get Onboard: Reduce. Reuse. Rethink&rs\quo/; proj【ect. The eco-friendly proof is in the puddin】g - as】 the【 final prototype is\ 】edible too.The new mea】l tray is made fr】om completely fo/od-safe, bio【degradeable constituen\ts. The tray itsel\f is】 made from coffee grounds and e】v】erythi】ng,\ down to the salad box l】id, is made from alternative materials】 like banana leaf and algae. The desig【n //studio had various \aims wh\en/ c】】reating】】 the concept, /inclu\ding /a reduction of single-】u/se pla\stics 【ge/nerated from a normal on【-board【 /【meal service, which the\y have managed to ac【hieve.【Other impressive\ fe\a\ture【s include an edi】ble desse】rt lid made from wafer, a reus】able s【pork made/ from coconu】\t wood, c\apsules used for sauces 】or milk/ ma/de from\ soluble seaweed and a【 h【ot mai\n \/me/al li//d made fr【】o【m \bamboo.Edib\le airline meal trayPriestmanGoode\“While there is currently no pe【【rfect solution\, \this】 \des【ign proposa】l aims to encourage su\pp】/l/iers and ai\rlines to rethin/k the m\eal servi【ce in a more eco-friendly manner, 】particu/l】arly ahead of legislation t/o ban single-use plastic,】 which in】/ som\e/ 】count\【\ries is pr】o【po/sed for as early as /2021,” say】s Jo Rowan, Associate/ //Strategy Director at Pri【estmanGood】e,/ in a press \rel】ease.Th【e design team has also inven【te/d 【a new travel【\ water bottle,/ feat【ured bel/o】w, made\ /from compostable bio-plastic and cor】k. I\t/ is desi【gned /to be used ove【r a short/-term period such as /a\ holiday and\ refilled regularly. While on-board, a water co】oler \cart would ideally be availab\le o/n the a】ircraft/, allowing /passeng】ers to refill dur【ing/ the flight to【 mini【mise buying plastic bottl/es. View thi\s post on Instagram】How can we reduce plastic bot/tl/e waste w/he/n we t】/\ravel? In our exhibition 'Get Onboard: Re/duce. Reuse. Reth】ink' @designmuseum now open, we pr【opose a w/ater b】ottle】 made from】 】biodegradable and commercial\ly c/ompostable \bioplastic and cork. \The b【ot】\tle is designed for repe\ate/d, \but shor\】【t term u\s【e, like the le/ng/th of your/ holiday, and is\ desi\g】ned \to address the im】pulse\ buy at ai/rports and statio【ns . Did you know that if passengers @heathrow_air/por\t depart/ures loung【es r【efilled from water fountains rather\ than bought plasti/】c bottles, the airport would be a【ble/】 to r】educe it【s plas/tic bott\【le /c】onsumption b/y /35/ million a year. Fa\ct vi//a \@refillhq ./ . . . . #pri\e【stmangoode #getonboard \#su\stainabl】e/design #sustai】nable #sustainability #sustainable\t】/ravel\ #zerowast/e #ecomater\ials #et/hical #cmf #ma\terials #biodegradab\le #compost/【able #\ldf19 #travelne\ws【 #avi】ati/on #in\du/strialdesig/n #pro【ductdesign\ #innovation #【de/【sign #desig】nnew【s #\desig【nthinking #design【studio \#l/o】ndonde】/sign #ecodesign #de】signinspiration #d/esignlife #tr\ansport #biodesign #tran/sportdesign . @design @dezeen @wallpa【perm】ag @designboom @designmilk @l_d_f_offic\ial @thedesi\gnair【 @design_b】urger @designers_need @pr/o\】deez @】lemanoosh_official @id_curate\d /@thepoint【sguy @the】pointsguyuk @design\bunker \@yankodesign @letsdes\【igndai】ly【 @_desig】n【_inspirationA post /share【d by PriestmanGoode (@priestmangood\e) on Se\p 12, 2019 at 11:31p/m PDTGet Onboar\d: Reduce\.Reus】e.Rethink at London's D\】esign MuseumPr/iestm\anGoode】】 s【pecialises【 in 【ind【ustrial d\esi【gn for 【the transp\ort and aviation sectors, with a particular focus on environment\a】l inno/vation【/. Its newes/t exhibitio【n at the Desig\n Museum in London explores \the iss/】ue of【 \waste in travel and \looks 】at how de】velop\ments in eco \mat\e/ri\als can \make the industry more sustainable【./ Materials inclu【de Econyl, a\ regenerated nyl\on yarn made from salvage【d fishi/ng nets, seaweed ya\【rn and 】so\me\ you 【may not have he】ard of like pineapple wood and【 Tasma】n recycle/d glass.【\According to st】a【tisti\cs】 】on their web/site, an esti\mated 5.7 milli【\on \to】nnes of cabin waste is gen】erated \on/ pass【enger fli\ghts every year, from 】sing/le】-use 【plast【ic in am\enities kit】s, to mea】l trays and earphone/s. The exhibition showcases how suppl\iers/, green in】itiatives and attempted cha【nges 【i\n custo\mer beh【avio【ur /can transform o/u】r experience across all transport modes. View this po/st on Instagra【mIf y/o【u're i【n London, 【make \/sure to visit our ex/hibition 'Get Onboar】d: Reduce. Reuse.【 Reth【ink' n\ow showing @desig\nmuseum 【. T【he ex【hibition addresses t】he issu】e of 】waste in travel, and 【explores how design thinking \【and material in【novation can】 help /us\ rethink the produc/ts 【and\ services tha【t /make up our journeys . ./ . . . #priestmangoode #getonboar/d #sustai】nabledesig\n #su】/stainable #s/ustainabil\ity 【#su\stainabletravel #zerowaste #ecomateria【ls【 #ethic/al #cmf #materials #biodegrada\ble #com【postable #ld【f19 #t【/ravelnews 【#aviation #industrialdesign #【productd/esign #innovati\on #design #designnew】s #designthin【k/in【g #d/esignst【udio #/londondesign #ecodesign #design】inspiration #designlife #tra】nsport #biodesign #transportdesign . \@d/ezeen @wallpaperma【】g @designboom @telegra】phtr【\av】el【 @sundaytimest】rave】l @tabilabo @n//atgeotraveluk @lonelyplanetmag @condenast/traveller @travelandleisure\ @timeoutl/】ond\on】】 @londonist_co\】m @wiredA post\ shared by PriestmanGoode (@\priestman/】goode【) on Sep 29\, 2019 at 9:0】9am PDTJo\ Ro】wan /concludes/, P/riestmanGoode want to &ldq】uo;raise awaren】ess of /how much was【te is c/reated when we tr/avel, and expl】ore al】ternat】ives that/ addres\】s t/he supply of】 products a】nd 】services/, but【 also what e/ach in】dividual can do to lead us to a m\ore sustainable travel industry.” 【 Get O/【n/board: Reduce.Reu\se.Rethink】 is on at 】\the\ Design Mu\seum in /London 】from 12th Se】】ptember】 2019/ \until【 9th February 2020.\Sha【re this ar/ticl】e 【 】】 Mor【e 】from】 【lifeyUvn

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PR8jYou can find huge q/uanti【\ties of jelly/fish in European \seas,\ but in\ som\e areas the \number of blooms is【 problemat【ic】.T\h/e \Slo/venian coast on th/e Adriatic Se/a is among those regions\ affected by destructive invasio【ns.Re/search】】ers in the coun/try believe we 】could \somehow take advant/age of this pro\lifera/tion, es\p【ecia【lly in【/】 their poten】tial 【to clean【 up the oceans.Jell【yfish blooms a\re said t】o be a consequence of ove】rfi/sh\i【ng,\ and glo\】【bal war】ming/.Mar/ine chemis/t Katj/a Klun, who's fro】m the Slo/venia Nat\io【nal 】Instit【ute o】】f Bi】ology s/tudies l】ocal s】pecies】, such【 as barrel jellyfish and is i\/nterested in the mucus it secret【es."The r】elease/ of mucus is, of\ 【course, an indication of】 the stress. They want to protect\ th【】/emselves,"【 she says.In coop】eration wit/h Israeli 【res\earch\ers, 】the lab\oratory is de】\veloping a prototype 【of a filt【er for \treat】ment plants, u\sing jellyfish mucus.Their work is based on the a【b【\ility of the viscous l】i\/quid to trap mic【roplastic par】t【\icles.【】But /beyond this, she says "w【e \need to think about 【the sus/tainability of this te\chnology. So there is a need for more research, more pro/jects, and studying so not to be 】de\pendent】 on the 】s【easona【l【ity \of the jellyfish, how to【 cultivat】e/ i【t, and so on".A 】Europ】ean research projec/t cal/led GoJelly is aski【n】g\ whether we】 shoul】d f/i\sh jell】yfish, 】or grow them?"The wor】ld is s【earching fo/r new resources an】d \new mar/ine resources," says Amileh 【Javid【pour, a【 biologist and oceanologist and GoJe【ll【y project coordinato/r."That is 【【where the word blue growth is coming f/】ro\m. GoJelly shows the】 poss【i\bilities of usi【ng this biomass for】 a\ 【circular eco/nom\y"】.Another【 research focus is the possibility\ of\ producing agri【cultural fertilizer.Jellyfish contain r】are nutrients, such a\s phosphate, nitrogen and potass【ium th【at 【ar\e agricultural】 residues releas/e/】d at sea and a【bs】orbe\d by】 the an\ima\l.But scientists fa【ce many cha【lleng\】es, 【starting wit\h conservatio/n."If we \choose to t】reat them fresh, w\e/ can not keep jellyfish fo/r a lo\ng/ time. Therefore, we】 preserv\e them accord/ing to various d\rying proce//sses\," says Thorsten\/ Reinsch an agr】icultura/l scientis】t at\ \Cau K\iel."Other challe\nges are: How can I 【bring this 】drie】d mater\ial to /th/e plant? \Wh\at effect would this h/ave/ on soil micro-organism\s, but also on pl】ant gro/】wth, g/round/water and air quality?"Elsewh\ere an\/d【 Italian team is wor\kin/g on the/ pos\sibility of eating】 them.Their resea/rch is sti】ll underway, but the\y say that once their venom is removed, jelly\fi】sh can\ be【 d】】e】licious and good for your health."This is an extract of a \jellyf【ish that conta/i【ned mic/roalgae inside itse/lf. So in this product, there's/ both jell】yfis/h and microalgae. It h【as st/【rong【 【anti-oxidant properties/ a】nd we h】ave demonstra\ted t【hat it also has the ab\ility to inhibit the /growth of\ human cancer cells,"【 】says Antonella Leone, agricultural g】】enetics, ISPA-CNRBusiness o】ppor\tuni【ties or not, researchers stress【 the /need for an environmental\l\y】\ friend】ly model.1/2/1】【】212Additi】【onal sour【c\es •\ Video ed/itor: Myriam 】Co/pierShare this articleCopy/paste th\【e art/icle video embe】d link below:Cop】yShare/TweetShare】sendShareTweetSharesendM】ore/HideShareSe\ndShareShareS】hareSendShareShareYou might also like / 【\ Could seawe\ed be the fu】el /of】 /the \future? \ 【 / 】 / Why mo】re and more martime com【panies are mak】ing the mo】ve/ /towards E-ves/sel【s / \ 【 \ 】 The deep-rooted tr\uth \abou/t chicory root 】 \ More ab/outpl【asticC】ontam/inati】on\ of 】waterEnviron\me【ntal pro【tectionFauna and Flora【 \ M/ost viewed 】 / 】 What infl/uence on cl】i】mat【e is the 】c/oronav/irus/\ lockdown really having? / / / \The new AI system safeguarding/ premature 【babi//es f】rom in/fection \ / Messenger RN【A: the molecule that may teach our bodies 【to beat cancer/ / 【 / / \Apple a【nd G/oo】gle say the/y'll work 】together t】o tra\ce sp】read of coronavirus via smart【pho】nes /【 \ 【 How EU f】unding is changing the【 face of Latvian innovation /【 \ \ \】 【 Br【owse today's tags7yLk

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IgeFScienti【st】s es【ti【mate that roughly 】on/e million la\n/d and\ marin【e species may】 bec【ome extinct in the foreseeab/le f\uture. Many within】 decades. What are the main【 reasons for th/e decl\ine\ of under/water ec\osystems?Thanos Dailianis, a marine\ biologist fr】om the\// HCM【R-IMBB\C /resea【rc【h instit/ute /【in【 Crete,/ exp\la/\i】ns.“Marine ecosyste】ms are threatened bo/th locally 】\an【d globally/. At the lo\cal l】【evel, the/ coastal zo】ne hosts】 a lot of 【human activities, 】/ i\mp】】o\rt\ant human activities, like 】urban【isation, like agricu\lture, industry of】 co/urse, and【 ot\her uses which cause loc【a\lise/d fo】rms of degradation, l【ike pollutio/n,/ l】et’s s\ay.""But on the other hand, we have la\rge-sca\【le ph】enomena, like global warming/, or ocea/n a\cidificat/ion, which【【 \of course jo】in toge/the】r with the local】 pre\ssures and【 cause/ sometimes uncontrolled ef【/fects【.""In Crete, 】we’/re located in t/he Eastern/ Mediterranean which】/ ri\ght now【 i/s the warmest place in the Mediterranean/ basin.\ This【, a/】lon/【gsid\e with】 the adjacency with /the S\u【ez Cana【l, makes \it】 very sus\ce】pti【ble to ch【an/g【e right now.""So what we see here is an// early w】arning o/f 】things that will probably spread/ 】towards【 the 】west】 of the Mediterranean /in the\ fo\】rthcoming\ years.""/And【 of cour\se, these t【hings also happen at the global level. Global w/armin/g is a global t/hr【eat, of course, and species coming fr【/om other parts /of \th/e world is【 a universal trend right now becaus【e of this ong/oing c/hang/e.""We are of c【ourse c/oncerned because we feel it is our duty to preserve t/his biodiversity for future generations, an/d we feel t【hat righ【/t now it/’s on the ve\rge of be】coming de\g\r\ade\d.""Nature finds its ways, and t【/his 】ri/ch/ness will/ be replaced by \another richness. /The】 problem is\ mainly for us because we ha】v【e built our 【lives \with this biodive/rsity, so the loss of t/his biodiversity 【will /ma/inly af/【】f\ect hum【【ans as a species.""T】he \service\s it provides to us,/ the food, the 】\environment; all the】 stuff that makes】 our【 life nice \t【o live.\&/rdquo;Share this art】icle\【Copy】/paste the article video\ embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShare】SendS】hareShareShareSendShareS】hareYo【u /might a\lso like 】 】 】 What’s k/illing】 our \unde【rw/ater ecosystems? 】 【 】 】 / 】 】 Uncharted wate】rs: how maps ca/n help prevent conf\lict o【v/er /marine resources 】 / 【 \ 【 【 \ \ Famil】y-run fisheries struggle as n/ew generation casts net wider 】 【 More a】boutOceanFauna and Flor【aEn\vironment/【al prot【\ectionbiodiversityGree【ce 】 Mo】st viewed \ \Wh】at influ/ence on climate i\s the corona\virus lockdown rea\lly【 having? \ 【 【 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from infec】tion 【 Me/ssenger RNA: th【e mol【ecul/e that \may teach \our bodies to b【e/at cancer 【 \ 【 Apple and Go\ogle 【say they'll work toge/th【er to trace spr\e\ad of coronavirus\ \via smart\p\hones / How EU】 funding is changi\ng 【【the face of La\tvian innova】ti\on \ 】 Browse today�/39;s tagsXa8z

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hHQQ【Coron【【/avirus in Europe:】 W【h】/y has Portu【gal not been as ba】dly hit by /COVID-19 a\s n\e/ighbour【 S\pai【n?hXVh

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6uluDefo\restation in 【the Brazilian Amazon \rainforest went up by 13.7% between August 2017 a【nd\// /July 2018【, accordin】g\ t【o the \coun】t【r/y’s\ Natio/n/al I/nstitute for /Space Researc\h (I\NPE).The INPE】 said that【 becau/se /of the incr/eased/ deforestation,\ Brazil had lost a\ total area of 7.900 km&/sup【】2; of rainforest, which G\reen【peace Br/azil estimates is c】lo\se t\o a million】 football pit【ch【es or five times the 【\size of 【London — Europe's larg/est city by\ area.Brazil has t】he\ largest】 sur/face of the A】mazon rain【forest in South Ame【rica.Our pic\ture gallery shows 【the scope of deforestation this pa】st year /in Brazil's Amazon for】est/....New Gallery 2018】//28 © Christian 【Bra【ga / 【Green】peac】eo【riginal/date 1/1/0001 6:00:0/0 AMwidth \】1200he\igh】t 801 &cop【y/】; Christian Braga \/ Greenpeaceoriginaldate 1/1/00/01 6:00:00 AMwidth】 2】5】/00height/ 16REU\TERS/UESLEI MARCELINOor/iginaldate \/1/1/0【001 6:00:00 AMwidth 6720heigh/t 4480 © C/hristian Braga /\【【 Gre】e】np【eacecameramake NIKON C【ORPORATIONfocal/length 24h【ei/ght 800fnumber 6.3exposu/retime】 0.】00062【5alt: 2/60lat【: 【/-10.754733【l/ong: -68.743800】c【/amerasoftwa【re Adob【e\ Photosho】】p Lighoriginaldate 10//3/2018】 3:50:36 PM\width 1200c\ameramod/】el /NIKON /D850 © C/hristian Braga / Greenpeac【ecameramake NIKON CO/R【PORA】T/IONfocal】leng】】th 31height 800fnumber 【10e\xposuretime 【0.000】al【t: 240la/t: -9.8】9893/3long: -68.710900camerasoftwar】e Adobe】/ Photoshop Lighor\iginaldate 10/3】//20 5:32:40 PMwidt\h 1200cameramo【del NIKON D850 © Christian Braga / Greenp/ea【cecam】eramake 】NI\K\ON CORPORATIONfocallength 95he【ight 800fnumber 4.5\exp\osuretime 0.000】625cameraso【ftware Adobe Pho】toshop L【ighorigi/naldat/e 10】/2/2018【 9:43: PMwidth /1200\cameramodel N\IKON【 D850According to Gr【eenpeace Brazil, the /cause for 】the i【\ncreased defore/station lies in】 【Brasilia with the government.The NGO blam\es the rural lob\by i【n【 C【ongress for\【 &ldqu】o;threat\ening the rainforest, its peop】le,\ and the planet’s climate&【rdquo;.The l【obb】y’】s agenda incl【udes promo/tin【g farm/ers’ rights, expa【nd\ing】 arable lan\d in the country, and opposes the e【xpa【nsion of indigenous lands, according to 【\【Brazilian me【dia.“This set o】f pr】opo【s】als benefit those who want t【o destroy】 the rainfor【est, g\rind l】an【d】\, and steal the natur/al】 heri【\ta【ge of the Brazilian peop【le. The consequences are translated into 】the a】moun【】t of\ destruction/ in the Amazo】n,” said M\arcio Astrini, coor/di/【nator of public policy for Gre/e/npeace 】Br/azil.Brazil's 【environment minister/ Edson Duarte said i/n 【a statement】 that illegal logging was the main fact\o【r for 】the increas【ed de\forestation. While Brazil's Cl/i\ma/te Ob】servatory, a net】【work of NGOs, said in another statement that ap】art fro\m/ illegal loggin\g it was the growi】ng】 commodities s】ector that was\ c【on/tributin\g to fo【re【st destruc】tion. The green NGO also w/arns th】at the environmental politi/c】s of Braz】il's ne】w presiden【t【, Jair B【olsona\ro, co\uld furth\er devastate the 】rainforest."He's\ said \that\ he would put an end to protecte【d areas【, to lands reserve】d to indigenous communities, that h】e would reduce inspections /and sanctions aga/】in/st e】nvironmental cri】mes. Every】thing that reduc【ed def【orestation 【before. If he 【elimin\ate】s】 all of this,/】 it would trigger a【n unimaginable si/tuation," said Astrini】.Euronews has reached out to【 G】ree【npeace Brazil for comment\ on th/e current defore/station of Br\az\il's Amazon ra】in】forest.Share this articleShareTweetSha/resendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShareSha/re\Send【Sha【reShareYou might a\lso \like \】】 Watch:】 Footage of uncontacted Amazon t】ri/be m】emb/ers e/merges/ as /deforesta【tion expands \ \ \ \ 】 【 Amazon wildfires: Wh【y is\ the South /Americ/an rainforest 【so important? 】 】 \ 】 / Amazon fires 】generate smoke clo】ud almost a/s \bi\g as devastating\ Siberia blaze \ 【\】 //M\ore a/boutEnvironment\Envir】onm】ental protectionBrazilAm\azonia 【 Browse today【'\;\s tagsO2FH

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7xgkText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placestP5w

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HgDNWhat if】\ 】/】we use】d the sea to diver\s/\if//y the stock of a/vailable biofuels?Resear\chers in Aarhus, De\nm【a\rk, are developing a fin【ancially via】ble process that does 】just that/.An ordina\ry ca】r is used to test the seaw【\eed fu【e\l, whi【ch scientists ca//ll a 3rd generation biofuel, and is a sustainable alternative to f/oss\il fuel】s.The tank is filled w】ith 10% seaweed fuel,】 the rest with petrol】 and its performance is compared with gas station fuels."The/ e【missions we 【meas【ure are CO, C【O2, and NOX. And \addi】tionally, we are measuring th/e pa/rticula/te emissi】on】s from th】e car,"/ sa\ys Sten Frand\sen - mechanica/l【 e【ngineer and busin】e【ss【 manage】r at DT】\I."The emission te】sts we got fr】om/ the seaweed】 fuel is on exactly the 【s【ame level /\as wha\t w】e \get from the \r】eferen/ce fuel."Sea【weed biofuel 】does not e/mit less CO2,\/ but \unl/ike \petrol, it extracts CO2 from the a\tmosphere while \gro【wing.\The】 researchers plan t\o \increase 】the portion 】used in the engi】ne tank, convinced that w【e will switch 】to biofuels in 【the upcoming years."We see】 a lot of el\ectrical cars entering the m/】arket, b】ut is that a one fix-all solution for /the CO2/ em【ission【s?" asks\ Frandsen."\Because we have hea【vy-duty tran】/\sport, we have sh】i】ps/ we have aerop/lanes,/ still c】onsuming a large amount of fossil fuels. We \nee】d 】a subst】i/tute for tha】t, and maybe\,【 seaweed co【uld be\/ som/e of the【 soluti【【on【".Why /is seaweed sustainabl\e? 【First, be\caus【e it /grows 】everywhere. It only needs the su\n and the sea,// which covers 70% of ou\r planet】.Its cultivation does not /requir【e any arable 】la\nd, 】fertilizer or freshwater/,/ like othe】r\ biof\u【els made out of/ agricultural \r\esidues for exam\ple.But 】how can 【this new fu\el be produced on an industrial 】s/cale? /This is the ch\allenge of 】a European re】search【 pr】oject c/alled Mac/roF/uels.Scien\【tists at the laboratory【 in P/etten, Nether【lands, 】are /searching f【o】r the best way t\o convert/ seaweed sug\ars to f\ue【ls.In/ some specie/s, this can r/【epres【ent up 【to 60% of\ the plant.【In /the l/】ong term, th/ey woul/d no l\onger】 have to produce bot/tles, /b\ut tons of 】ethanol and butanol barrels.】 S】til\l follo】wing a rat\her basi【c process\:"First /w\/e t】ake s\eawe/ed. And t\hen we use wa/ter to get the suga/rs】 out with some enzymes or acids," says Jaap Van 【Hal, a 【chemist &am\p; i【n\【n\ovation manager at b】iorefin/ery, TNO and macrofuel p/roject scie【ntific coordinat】o】r."\A】nd then you \get a sugar solution, and j/ust like you\ pr【oduce wine or beer, you f\er】ment it to /Ethanol or But\anol, and you blend t/hat with normal ga\soline or d【iesel to pr\oduce E10 \and t/hen you 【drive y/our car \on i】t."More biofuel/ production means more /se/aweed biomass. Th/anks to economies of scale an/d mechaniz/at/ion, res/e\archers\ h/ope to cut the fue\l produc【tio/n costs by 100 per cen】t.T【oget【her with comm【ercializi】ng oth/er】 seaweed 【products【, this could make fuels economically\ feasible in the future."When we started】 the p【roject a couple o\f year/s /ago【/, we were working】 with square meters. Today we are do【in\g hectares, 【and in t【he \near future, we will go in the squar/e kilometre range," says Bert Groenendaal【/, a chemist & R&a/mp;/D project coo/rdinator at】 \】SIOEN.T】o/day】, th\e pr】ice 】of a l\itre【 of seaweed-based biofue\l \is /way to\o high, probably a】 /hundred times more expensi】ve than traditi/o】nal fuels. But when the scale will go up, the p】rice will \g】o down, and we【 will\ get into a ran\ge where we will/ be comp\etitive with tr\aditional /fuels."Based】 on the exa\mple of the w】i【nd secto【r, scientists estimate】 t【hat it will take around 25 \years for the technology to be p\r】ofitable on 【a very large scale.1212Ad【dition\al\ so】urces\ •【 Edi/tor,\ Christele Ben Al\iShare this articleCopy/pas】te\ the /article video embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharese【ndShareTweetSharesendMo】reH\ideShar\eSe/ndShareShareShareSendShareS【h【areYou might also lik】\e \】 Could jellyfis】\【h be the a【nswer to fighting o/cean pol/l\ution? 【 】】 / / / / / Liquid windows and the energy-ef】ficient bu【ildin【gs of tomorrow \ More ab\outCarsFuelResearchEcologyEn【vironm\ental protecti/on/ \ Most viewed 【 What influence on climate is\ t\he corona】virus 】lock/down /really havi】n/g【? 】 / / 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】pr\ema/ture babies \from infe【ction / \ Messen【ge/r RNA: the /molec\ule 【that\ may teach our 】bodie/s to beat cancer 【 / 【 \ 】 \ 】 Apple and Google【 say they&#;ll work togethe】r【 to trace spread of】 coronavirus via /sm】artph】o【nes【 / How EU funding is cha/n【ging the/ f【a【\】ce of Latvi/an innovation 】 / 【 】 Browse】\ to\da【y'】;s tagsRgzX

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